Hardy Honey Bee Farms’ Provides Local Raw Honey for Your Health and Great Taste!

Carl and Linda Daleo

Varieties purchasable only when in season, please call for availability:

 

  • Wildflower
  • Buckwheat
  • Black Locust
  • Blueberry
  • Goldenrod
  • Basswood
  • Sage Mint
  • Star Thistle
  • Clover
  • Autumn Olive
  • Purple Loosestrife
  • Alfalfa
  • Orange Blossom – Florida
  • Tupelo – Florida
  • Florida Tupelo honey  is one of the rarest honeys with an exquisite buttery flavor and light color.

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Welcome to the Hardy Honey Bee Farms website. Here you will find a complete list of our products and services, and you can learn interesting facts about honey, and its amazing health benefits, including allergy relief if the honey is local!

Besides honey and related products, Hardy Honey Bee Farms is available to perform other related services, as well.

Services Available:

  • Nest Removal
  • Swarm Removal
  • Pollination Services
  • Hive and Nuc Sales
  • Apiary Consulting

Hardy Honey Bee Farms distributes its hives around the local area to bring you the wide variety of honey variety and flavors, of which there are many. Each variety has its own unique flavor, depending on the specific plant or tree that was used by the bees to make the honey.

Hardy Honey is all natural, raw, pure honey. It is not pasteurized, because honey is the one food that never spoils. Also, nothing is added, like in many supermarket brands that add corn syrup, or other additives. Raw honey is the best tasting, and also the most nutritious.

To demonstrate the possible hazards of buying honey from unknown sources, check out this article on the dumping of suspect Asian honey into the U.S. market.

HONEY HISTORY

Honey is as old as written history, dating back to 2100 B.C. where it was mentioned in Sumerian and Babylonian cuneiform writings, the Hittite code, and the sacred writings of India and Egypt. It is presumably even older than that.

Through out history man has enjoyed the delicious sweet taste of honey. Honey was man’s first sweetener. Ancient man treasured this natural sweet because it could not until recently be obtained in large amounts and because it was the only sweetener available.

In some early civilizations honey was reserved for the rich who could afford such luxuries. Taxes were many times paid in honey because of it’s great value!

Its name comes from the English hunig, and it was the first and most widespread sweetener used by man. Legend has it that Cupid dipped his love arrows in honey before aiming at unsuspecting lovers.

In the Old Testament of the Bible, Israel was often referred to as “the land of milk and honey.” Mead, an alcoholic drink made from honey was called “nectar of the gods,” high praise indeed. Through out history, Apiculture has been important for providing medicine as it has food.

In days of old, honey has been used not only in food and beverages, but also to make cement, in furniture polishes and varnishes, and for medicinal purposes.

And, of course, bees perform the vital service of pollinating fruits, legumes, vegetables and other types of food-producing plants in the course of their business of honey production.

Hardy Honey Bee Farms is owned and operated by Linda Daleo, and is a member of the Southeastern Michigan Beekeepers Association (SEMBA), Michigan Beekeepers Association (MBA) and the Tri-County Beekeepers Association.

 

Hardy Honey Bee Farms Makes it to Detroit!

 

Detroit Marriott at the Renaissance Center

Proudly serves our Michigan Made honey in their restaurants. The Marriott’s “Chef Brett” is also using it in his homemade granola recipe.  The Marriott supports Local Michigan Made Products and the city of Detroit.

The Detroit Marriott Sweetens up the City with our Michigan Local
“Hardy Honey”

Motown Rocks Hardy Honey!

Motown Rocks the Motor City with Hardy Honey!

Mackinaw Island Murdick’s Fudge Teams up with Hardy Honey to Create Brand New Flavor!

hh-murdicksOriginal Mackinaw Island Murdick’s Fudge teams with Hardy Honey Bee Farms to create Monica Drake-Carter’s new Michigan Honey Butter fudge flavor!

Read Story

 

UM BEES

Hardy Honey Bees At U of  M

Hardy Honey Bees At U of M

Hardy Honey Bee Farms is proud to have donated a colony to benefit the University of Michigan’s sustainable food program and the Mattei Botanical gardens.  M Go Blue!

I want to thank you for putting me (and my student organization) in contact with Carl and Linda from Hardy Bee Farms during the SEMBA Conference. They were so generous to donate a colony to us. They gave us an amazing colony in a deep super, as well as another deep super, a medium, a bottom board, an inner and outer cover, a top feeder, and all the frames with wax foundation. The colony has grown so fast that I have added the other deep already.

I am so grateful for Hardy Bee Farms’ generosity and to you for putting me in contact with them. We have already had many educational outings to the UMBees Apiary where many students, new to bees, have learned about beekeeping and the importance of a positive human/honey bee interaction.

Parker Anderson

President, UMBees

University of Michigan

Hardy Honey Bee Farms Credited in Hourly Detroit

Click here to see the full article.

Hardy Honey Bee Farms has been credited in the Detroit Hour Magazine. Our Honey was used in their photo shoot for the story on “HONEY” in the May 2012 issue, in the food section!

Hardy Honey Supplies More Than Honey

Historic Greenfield Villiage

Historic Greenfield Village Dearborn Michigan

Hardy Honey Bee Ancestors and brood cousins from our Happy Hives are now located at Greenfield Village in the farm’s orchard, owned and managed by Ann Fernandez.

Attention Mead Makers

Mead Ma Ma's Award for "Best of Show"

Mead Ma Ma’s Award for “Best of Show”

Mead Ma Ma’s have won Gold, Silver and best of show in the 2013 Michigan Home Brewing Competition using Hardy Honey Bee Farms Honey!

In July 2013 at the Michigan Honey Festival they also won Gold and 2 silver awards using our Hardy Honey!

Mead Ma Ma’s won first and third place as well as third best in show with honey from Hardy Honey Bee Farms at the Michigan beer cup competition.

One of the persistent legends of Mead is this: It was the accepted practice in Babylon 4,000 years ago that for a month after the wedding, the bride’s father would supply his son-in-law with all the mead he could drink. It was believed that mead honey wine would raise the chances of this couple producing male offspring. Because their calendar was lunar based, this period was called the honey month or what we know today as the honeymoon.  We all know after the Honeymoon is over, the Honey do list is next.

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